PLENARY SESSIONS

Stephen Wolfram


Computer Science
Theoretical Physics Mathematics
Stephen Wolfram

How Universal Is the Idea of Numbers?


Jessica Flack


Collective Computation
Evolutionary Theory Cognitive Neuroscience
Jessica Flack

Coarse-Graining as a Downward Causation Mechanism in Nature

David Krakauer


Complex Systems
Information Theory Evolution
David Krakauer

How Darwinians
Count the World


Grace W. Lindsay


Computational Neuroscience
Models of the Mind
Grace W. Lindsay

Discrete Symbols vs. Continuous Neurons


Rafael Núñez


Cognitive Science
Mathematical Cognition Embodied Mathematics
Rafael Núñez

Where do Numbers Come From?


Karenleigh A. Overmann


Cognitive Archaeoloy
Origin of Numbers
Karenleigh A. Overmann

In Search of
Prehistoric Numbers


Nicolas Gisin


Quantum Information
Real Numbers in Physics
Nicolas Gisin

Time in Physics and Intuitionistic Mathematics

Regina Fabry


Philosophy of Mind
Encultured Arithmetic 4E Cognition
Regina Fabry

Capturing Developmental Dyscalculia

Andrea Sereni


Epistemology
Philosophy of Mathematics Philosophy of Language
Andrea Sereni

Counting Numbers, Counting Things


Menachem Magidor


Set Theory
Mathematical Logic
Menachem Magidor

Is Independence in Mathematics Relevant to Science?

Kevin Buzzard


Algebraic Number Theory
Formal Proof Verification
Kevin Buzzard

Teaching Computers about Numbers


FIELD GUIDE

One of the great challenges faced when attempting genuine interdisciplinary discourse is to break the barriers imposed by technical conventions and specialized jargon. Here is an interactive glossary of terms, taken mostly from the abstracts and materials provided by the plenary speakers, to aid in focusing the conversation on the conceptual core of the questions across disciplines.

See Field Guide

See Field Guide

Participants

Applicants to Numerous Numerosity were selected to participate in the live plenary sessions on the basis of the potential for scientific cross pollination. The final group of participants is diverse and intersectional, a good reflection of the conference subject matter itself. Here are some data visualizations of the participant statistics.

See Paticipant Statistics

See Participant Statistics

LOGISTICS

This event takes place on May 24-28.

  • 09:00

  • 09:30
  • 10:00

  • 10:30
  • 11:00

  • 11:30
  • 12:00

  • 12:30
  • 13:00

  • 13:30
  • 14:00

  • 14:30
  • 15:00

  • 15:30
  • 16:00

  • 16:30
  • 17:00

  • 17:30
  • 18:00

  • 18:30
  • 19:00

  • 19:30
  • 20:00

  • Monday 24
    •   Opening
    •   Krakauer


      How Darwinians Count the World

    •   Social Time
  • Tuesday 25
    •   Magidor


      Is Independence in Mathematics Relevant to Science?

    •   Social Time
    •   Lindsay


      Discrete Symbols vs. Continuous Neurons

    •   Social Time
    •   Wolfram


      How Universal Is the Idea of Numbers?

    •   Social Time
  • Wednesday 26
    •   Gisin


      Time in Physics and Intuitionist Mathematics

    •   Social Time
    •   Overmann


      In Search of Prehistoric Numbers

    •   Social Time
    •   Núñez


      Where do Numbers Come From?

    •   Social Time
  • Thursday 27
    •   Sereni


      Counting Numbers, Counting Things

    •   Social Time
    •   Flack


      Coarse-Graining as a Downward Causation Mechanism in Nature

    •   Conference Social
  • Friday 28
    •   Fabry


      Capturing Developmental Dyscalculia

    •   Social Time
    •   Buzzard


      Teaching Computers about Numbers

*The schedule should show your timezone automatically. “D+1” indicates the hours shown are on the next calendar day. In case of doubt please follow the links to the YouTube livestreams by clicking on the timetable boxes. Here are the UTC times of the sessions:

Monday
16:30 - 17:00 Opening
17:00 - 19:00 Krakauer

Tuesday
12:00 - 14:00 Magidor
15:00 - 17:00 Lindsay
18:00 - 20:00 Wolfram

Wednesday
11:00 - 13:00 Gisin
14:00 - 16:00 Overmann
17:00 - 19:00 Núñez

Thursday
14:00 - 16:00 Sereni
17:00 - 19:00 Flack

Friday
10:00 - 12:00 Fabry
14:00 - 16:00 Buzzard

Plenary sessions are allocated 2-hour slots during the days of the main event. Plenary speakers are given some freedom on how to manage their session. Generally, there will be a talk followed by a moderated discussion among the attendees. It is perfectly acceptable to finish a plenary session early and not exhaust the allocated 2 hours.

Social breaks in between plenary sessions are allocated 30-minute slots. A virtual social space will be provided during the breaks for those willing to mingle and network informally with other participants. Tabarca is a small Mediterranean island off the coast of Spain where SEMF is planning a programme of scientific retreats. The social space (a Gather.Town room) is a virtual replica of the Tabarca island.

See Field Guide

The event will be livestreamed on the SEMF YouTube Channel.

Registration for the 2021 edition of Numerous Numerosity is now closed.

WORKSHOP

After the main event, on May 31 - June 1, a small-scale workshop will take place. The workshop will involve a small number of participants who will have the opportunity to share their research and ideas with peers coming from a broad spectrum of disciplines. Although all are welcome to apply, priority will be given to young researchers. Applicants will be selected based on the organizers' judgement on potential synergies and collaborations across scientific disciplines. The aim of this workshop is to create a friendly and welcoming atmosphere where scientific ideas can develop organically.

A schedule will be arranged so that each participant will have the opportunity to present a short talk on a topic related to some of the proposed questions (both original research and reviews of existing literature are welcome) with plenty of time for discussion and joint work in breakout groups. Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic this event will be hosted online with a combination of Zoom meetings and a Gather.Town social space.

Registration for the workshop of the 2021 edition of Numerous Numerosity is now closed.

Workshop Timetable


About

Plenary Sessions

The main event will consist of a series of plenary talks by invited speakers followed by moderated discussion sessions.

Informal Discussion

A social platform (Gather.Town) will be provided for informal discussion during coffee breaks. Participants will be able to use it at their leisure in between plenary sessions.

Online

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic this event will be hosted online. Details will be sent by email to registered participants. The event will be livestreamed on YouTube

Follow-up Workshop

The main event will be followed by a three-day workshop where young researchers will have the opportunity to engage in a friendly collaborative environment.

Interdisciplinarity

The aim of this event is to foster scientific cross-pollination by bringing together researchers from diverse areas of expertise.

Participate

Registration for the 2021 edition of Numerous Numerosity is now closed.

QUESTIONS AND DISCIPLINES

These are some of the fundamental questions and disciplines that will be touched upon during the event. Click here for a detailed list.

What cognitive systems process
numerical information?

Animal Cognition · Artificial Neural Networks Plant Cognition · Swarm Cognition
Information Theory

Are numbers in the hand, eye, brain
or mind of the beholder?

Neurophysiology of Vision · Machine Learning Embodied Cognition · Computer Vision Evolution

Is the world fundamentally numerical?
Does measurement reveal its nature?

Cosmology · Philosophy of Science · Metrology Computer Simulation · Mathematical Physics Metaphysics

How formally special is our number system?

Abstract Algebra · History of Mathematics Linguistics · Philosophy of Mathematics
Number Theory

What is it like to count?

Consciousness Studies · Philosophy of Mind
Psychoacoustics · Neurophysiology of Memory
Temporal Physics